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London's age structure

Key points

  • London's population has grown in recent years mainly because of the high number of births and low number of deaths.
  • The proportion of the population aged between 25 and 24 is much higher in Inner than OUter London; however, the proportion in Outer London is still higher than in the rest of England.
  • The proportion of the population of Inner London aged over 60 is far lower than either Outer London or the rest of England.
  • Children aged 5–15 make up a smaller proportion of the population in Inner London than they do either in Outer London or in the rest of England.
  • However, children agerd under 5 make up a slightly higher proportion of the population in both Inner and Outer London than they do elsewhere.

The age profile of Inner and Outer London compared to the rest of England

charted data. Tabulated source data can be downloaded as a separate file.

What does this graph show?

London's population churns constantly, but migration is not the key driver in the growth of London's population. The main reason London's population has grown in recent years is due to natural change - high numbers of births and low numbers of deaths. This is related to its young age structure, which is significantly different from the rest of England.

The proportion of the population in London aged 25-34 is far higher in Inner than Outer London, which is in turn higher than the rest of the country. About 25% of the population of Inner London is aged 25-34, compared to 15% in Outer London and 12% in the rest of England.

Conversely, the proportion of the population of Inner London aged over 60 is far lower than either Outer London or the rest of England. At about 12% of the population it compares to 17% in Outer London and 22% outside London. This makes a difference when considering poverty rates in the capital, as pensioners are one group whose risk of poverty has come down substantially in the last decade or so.

High birth rates in the capital mean both Inner and Outer London have a slightly higher proportion of under 5s than the rest of England. 120,000 births were recorded in London in 2006, about one in five of all births in England. However, children aged 5-15 make up a smaller proportion of the population in Inner London than they do either in Outer London or in the rest of England.

Data used

ONS Mid 2008 estimates