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Unemployment ratios by borough

Key points

  • Between 2009-11 and 2012-14, the unemployment ratio came down by 0.5 percentage points in London: down by 0.7 in Inner London and 0.3 in Outer London.
  • Seven boroughs experienced an increase in the unemployment ratio between these time periods, with the largest being Havering with a 0.5 percentage point increase to 6.5 percentage points.
  • The three boroughs with the highest unemployment ratios are all in east London: Barking and Dagenham (9.8%), Tower Hamlets (8.8%) and Newham (8.6%).

Unemployment ratios by borough

What does this graph show?

Looking specifically at the time period between 2009-11 and 2012-14, the unemployment ratio came down by 0.5 percentage points in London: down by 0.7 in Inner London and 0.3 in Outer London. However, seven boroughs experienced an increase in the unemployment ratio between these time periods, with the largest being Havering with a 0.5 percentage point increase to 6.5 percentage points. Of these seven boroughs with an increased unemployment ratio, six are in Outer London, with Kensington and Chelsea the exception. At the other extreme, there were nine boroughs that had a fall in the unemployment ratio that was double the London average. Six of these were Inner London boroughs, and the largest fall was Lambeth at 1.7 percentage points.

The three boroughs with the highest unemployment ratios are all in east London: Barking and Dagenham (9.8%), Tower Hamlets (8.8%) and Newham (8.6%).

London has a better unemployment picture than some of the other English core cities, however, most of which have seen either no change or a worsening unemployment ratio. For example, Sheffield's unemployment ratio has increased by 1.3 percentage points. Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Manchester (narrowly defined) have done as well or better over the last few years, but still have higher ratios overall than London.

Data used

Annual Population Survey via NOMIS, ONS.

Indicator last updated: 21 October 2015