The London's Poverty Profile website uses cookies to give you the best possible experience. By continuing, we will assume you are happy to receive all cookies on the website. More information on cookies can be found on our privacy page.

Out-of-work benefit claims in London over time

Key points

  • By the peak in 2009 the proportion of claimants was 12.1% in London compared with 11.8% in England as whole, after which the rate in London falls to 8.8% in 2014, below the rest of England at 9.0%.
  • 380,000 people were claiming Employment Support Allowance (or equivalent) at the end of 2014, with JSA claimants the next largest group at 120,000.
  • The total number of out-of-work benefit claimants in London fell from 690,000 in 2009 to 525,000 in 2014.

Key out-of-work benefit claims over time

What does the graph show?

This graph shows the proportion of people in London claiming an out-of-work benefit.

At the end of 2014 525,000 people in London were claiming an out-of-work benefit. This has been falling since the post-recession peak of 690,000 in 2009 and this fall has been faster in London than the average for the rest of England. The graph shows that throughout the 2000s, the proportion of people claiming one of the main three of out-of-work benefit claimants was higher in London than the average for England but the gap narrows. By the peak in 2009 the proportion of claimants was 12.1% in London compared with 11.8% in England as whole, after which the rate in London falls to 8.8% in 2014, below the rest of England at 9.0%.

Employment Support Allowance (or equivalent) is the most common type of out-of-work benefit claimed in London, received by 318,000 people unable to work through disability or ill-health. This number has remained relatively steady over recent years. The next largest group is JSA claimants at 120,000. Jobseekers drove the increase in claims during the recession and the subsequent fall. But a large fall can also be seen in the number of lone parent claimants which halved between 2009 and 2014, falling from 134,000 to 70,000. This is linked to a change in eligibility - lone parents are now required to actively seek work (and claim JSA) when their children are younger than was the case previously.

Data used

Working age client group benefit claims, DWP

Indicator last updated: 16 October 2015