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Housing benefit values

Key points

  • The average housing benefit value for London was £134 per week in 2013, much higher than the level for England of £92.
  • In 2013, the average housing benefit claim for someone living in local authority social housing was £107 per week, up from £68 in 2003.
  • The average housing benefit claim for someone in private rented sector accommodation was £176 in 2013, up from £114.

Change to housing benefit values in London

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What does this graph show?

The graph shows how the amount of housing benefit claimed has also increased. In 2013, the average housing benefit claim for someone living in local authority social housing was £107 per week, up from £68 in 2003. In the private rented sector the amount claimed was much higher at £176 in 2013, up from £114. The increase in housing benefit claimed in both tenures is around 55%. But as a greater proportion of housing benefit claims in 2013 came from the more expensive private rented sector, the overall average amount of claimed has increased at a faster rate of 60% (from £84 to £134).

The graph also shows that the average housing benefit value for England was £92 per week in 2013, much lower than the level for London of £134. This mirrors what we saw in the housing chapter on the cost of housing in London compared to the rest of England.

Additional information

LA is local authority, PRS is private rented sector and LHA is local housing allowance (the housing benefit that private renters can claim).

Data used

Benefit caseload data, DWP

NOTE: The data on this page may not be the most recent available because this indicator was not updated in our most recent report, published in October 2015. Nevertheless, we have chosen to keep the page live because it tells an important story about poverty in London, and the general pattern described here is unlikely to have changed significantly.

Indicator last updated: 2 December 2015