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DLA caseload by care award type

Key points

  • Around 22% of DLA claimants in London are entitled to the lowest care and mobility elements.
  • People in this group are the most likely to lose their entitlement under Personal Independence Payments (PIP).

Breakdown of working-age DLA claimants in London by care award type

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What does this graph show?

This graph provides a breakdown of working-age DLA claimants in London by care award type.

The next major welfare change to affect London will be the changes to disability living allowance (DLA) which for working-age claimants is being changed to the Personal Independence Payment (PIP). In the migration, about 20% of those entitled to DLA are expected to lose their entitlement to PIP.

There is reason to be concerned about the roll-out of PIP, given its echoes of another change to sickness and disability benefit from only five years ago: the replacement of Incapacity Benefit with Employment Support Allowance (ESA), the aim of which was to cut the caseload by a million. From the outset this policy was widely criticised for incorrectly assessing claimants as fit for work and removing their benefit entitlement.

DWP data shows that as more assessments were completed (including appeals) the proportion found fit for work fell. In London the outcome of the first 14,400 completed assessments (between October 2010 and July 2011) found 34% were fit for work. Of the 77,700 completed assessments by August 2012, 26% were found fit for work.

Whilst London does not have a particularly high proportion of people claiming DLA, there are over 200,000 working-age claimants in the capital. Around 22% of DLA claimants in London are entitled to the lowest care and mobility elements: these are the most likely to lose their entitlement under PIP.

Disabled people are particularly vulnerable to welfare reforms, given the high proportion lacking paid work, as shown in the worklessness chapter. Many will be less able to supplement the lost income by moving into work. In addition DLA is not conditional on lacking work, so those claimants that are able and can find a suitable job are presumably already in work.

Finally individuals in receipt of DLA are exempt from a number of other welfare changes: the single room rate change, the overall benefit cap and in some boroughs council tax support. If entitlement to DLA is lost, not only will individuals lose their DLA income, but they could also lose income from other benefits as they are no longer exempt.

Data used

Benefit caseload statistics, DWP, 2012

NOTE: The data on this page may not be the most recent available because this indicator was not updated in our most recent report, published in October 2015. Nevertheless, we have chosen to keep the page live because it tells an important story about poverty in London, and the general pattern described here is unlikely to have changed significantly.

Indicator last updated: 2 December 2015