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Low pay by gender

Key points

  • In 2016, the biggest group among the low paid were female part-time employees, with 220,000 or 31% of the total. This proportion is unchanged since 2014.
  • Between 2011 and 2016, the largest increase among these four groups was for women working full-time, with 80,000 more low paid.
  • 58% of low paid jobs in London are carried out by women.

Change in low-paid jobs by gender

Low pay by gender graph 2.png

What does this graph show?

This graph looks at the number of low-paid jobs by whether they are part-time or full-time and by whether they are held by men or women. In 2016, the biggest group among the low-paid were female part-time employees, with 220,000 or 31% of the total. Male full-time jobs are the next biggest group (200,000 or 27%), followed by female full-time jobs (170,000 or 24%). The smallest group, with under a fifth of the total, are the 130,000 male part-timers.

Between 2011 and 2016, the largest component of the increase in the number of low-paid jobs was those worked by women full-time, up by 80,000. Male low-paid employment increased by 70,000 for full-time jobs and 30,000 for part-time jobs. The number of low-paid part-time jobs done by women has increased by 60,000.

58% of low paid jobs in London are carried out by women.

Data used

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, ONS.

Indicator last updated: 4 November 2016