The London's Poverty Profile website uses cookies to give you the best possible experience. By continuing, we will assume you are happy to receive all cookies on the website. More information on cookies can be found on our privacy page.

Migration in and out of London

Key points

  • More people move from London to other parts of the UK than the other way round, and more people move to London from abroad than the other way round.
  • Since 2007, there have been more people coming to London from other parts of the UK than from the rest of the world.
  • The number of people coming to London from abroad has fallen since 2000 from its peak at above 200,000 to 140,000 in 2013.

Migration in and out of London

What does this graph show?

The graph shows how the number of people migrating in and out of London both domestically and internationally changed over time. Since 1998, more people have moved from London to other parts of the UK than the other way round, and more people are moving to London from abroad than the other way round.

The number of people leaving London for other parts of the UK was 250,000 a year for 2012 and 2013. This represents a slight rise over the past few years. The number coming from other parts of the UK was around 200,000 for those years, also a rise since the lowest number of 150,000 in 2003. Since 2007, there have been more people coming to London from other parts of the UK than from the rest of the world.

The number of people coming from abroad has fallen since 2000 from its peak at above 200,000 to 140,000 now. The number leaving the UK for abroad has fallen slightly, from its peak of 120,000 in 2009 to 90,000 now. In general then, migration within the UK is increasing while international migration has been decreasing.

Net migration was at a peak in the late 1990s, saw a trough in the early 2000s, and is now relatively stable, with a slight change from positive to negative net migration (more in than out) between 2011 and 2012. This demonstrates that the main driver of London's population growth in the last decade has been the number of births being higher than the number of deaths, rather than the number of people moving in being higher than those moving out.

Data used

International Migration and Internal Migration estimates, ONS

Indicator last updated: 15 October 2015