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Ratio of low and high house prices by borough

Key points

  • The ratio of upper quartile to lower quartile house prices rose in every London borough in the last ten years.
  • There are 13 boroughs where top quartile prices are double that of bottom quartile prices; ten years earlier, there were only four.

Ratio of upper and lower quartile house prices by borough

What does the graph show?

This graph looks at the range of house prices within each borough and how this has changed in the last decade. It shows a ratio between the top and bottom quartile house price in each borough in 2004 and 2014. An increase in this disparity would suggest an increased inequality in the property wealth among owner-occupiers but in practice the actual wealth of the individual household depends on how much they still owe on their mortgage.

The ratio of upper quartile to lower quartile house prices rose in every London borough in the last ten years. This growing gap partly reflects the difference in price between smaller and larger properties but also different price areas within a borough. In 2014 the top quartile point of house prices is at least 1.5 times the bottom quartile point in all except two boroughs - Newham and Barking & Dagenham. There are 13 boroughs where top quartile prices are double that of bottom quartile prices; ten years earlier, there were only four.

Data used

House Price Indices, ONS

Indicator last updated: 21 October 2015