The London's Poverty Profile website uses cookies to give you the best possible experience. By continuing, we will assume you are happy to receive all cookies on the website. More information on cookies can be found on our privacy page.

Concentrations of benefit recipients by borough

Key points

  • Over half of people claiming benefits in Kensington & Chelsea, Bromley and Westminster live in one quarter of the areas. In those boroughs, the least deprived quarter of areas have less than 10% of all benefit recipients.
  • In contrast, in Newham, Barking & Dagenham and Lewisham, around one third of benefit recipients live in the poorest quarter of areas.

Concentrations of benefit recipients by borough

What does the graph show?

This graph shows people claiming out-of-work benefits in each borough. It shows the highest claiming quarter of areas and the lowest claiming quarter of areas. The areas in question are known as lower level super output areas, which on average contain around 1,500 people.

If there was no polarisation in a borough, one would expect to find a quarter of claimants in each quarter of areas. If there was total polarisation, all claimants would be in one quarter. So the greater the proportion of claimants who live in the most deprived quarter, and the lower the proportion in the least deprived quarter, the greater the polarisation. In the graph, the most polarised boroughs are on the left, the least polarised on the right.

Over half of people claiming benefits in Kensington & Chelsea, Bromley and Westminster live in one quarter of the areas. In those boroughs, the least deprived quarter of areas have less than 10% of all benefit recipients. In contrast, in Newham, Barking & Dagenham and Lewisham, around one third of benefit recipients live in the poorest quarter of areas. On the whole this trend is no different to the previous 2013 report.

The line shows the proportion of people claiming benefits. One would expect a greater degree of polarisation in areas with low levels of benefit receipt - if only one person claimed, polarisation would be 100% on this measure. If everyone claimed, there would be no polarisation at all. So the peaks and troughs along the line indicate if an area is unusual. Enfield, Haringey and to some extent Hammersmith & Fulham and Westminster stand out as being above the overall trend. These boroughs are more polarised than would be expected given their levels of benefit receipt. But compared with 2012 these spikes are less visible, as the overall number of claimants has fallen across London.

Data used

Longitudinal Series, DWP

Indicator last updated: 15 October 2015