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High and low pay in the English regions

Key points

  • The top 10% of employees in London receive at least £1,420 per week, compared with £1,080 in the South East, the next highest region.
  • At the bottom end of the pay scale, 10% of employees in London earn no more than £340, compared with no more than £300 in any other region.
  • London's 90:10 ratio, at 4.1, is much higher than other UK regions.

Pay at 90th and 10th percentile in the English regions

What does the graph show?

One of the major drivers of inequality in London is the disparity in wages between high paid and low paid workers. This graph shows the level of pay for full-time jobs at the 10th percentile and the 90th percentile in each region of the UK apart from Wales. It also shows the ratio between these two values. The figures are for residents rather than jobs, so the graph shows the levels of pay of people living in London rather than those working there.

London has the most unequal pay distribution of any part of the UK, wholly due to very high pay at the top end. The top 10% of employees in London receive at least £1,420 per week, compared with £1,080 in the South East, the next highest region. The lowest level is in Yorkshire and the Humber where the top 10% receive at least £880 per week.

At the bottom end of the pay scale, 10% of employees in London earn no more than £340, compared with no more than £300 in any other region. It's worth noting that unlike the previous figures on income inequality, here pay is before tax and housing costs. As pay at the top in London is much higher than the rest of England, but pay at the bottom is only slightly higher, London's 90:10 ratio, at 4.1, is much higher than all other English regions.

Data used

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, ONS

Indicator last updated: 15 October 2015