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Income inequalities by wards within London boroughs

Key points

  • Haringey is the most divided borough in London. Of its 19 wards, four are in the richest 10% and five are in the poorest 10%.
  • Newham and Barking & Dagenham both have many of the poorest wards in London and none of the richest.
  • Richmond has 13 of the richest wards but not a single ward in the bottom 10%.

High income wards and low income wards by borough

LPP 2009 - inequality by ward new.png

What does the graph show?

From left to right, boroughs are ranked by the variation between the number of rich and poor wards. This ranking assigns rich wards a value of 1, poor wards a value of -1 and calculates the statistical variance in each borough.

The five most divided boroughs are all in Inner London: Haringey, Tower Hamlets and Southwark in the Inner East & South, and Kensington & Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham in the Inner West.

Haringey is the most divided borough in London. Four of its 19 wards are in the richest 10% and five are in the poorest 10%. Tower Hamlets and Southwark are the next most divided boroughs, with two of the richest and four of the poorest wards in each area. (Southwark has been ranked lower above because it has a larger total number of wards.)

Newham and Barking & Dagenham have many of the poorest wards in London but not a single rich ward. Richmond has 13 of the richest wards but not one in the bottom 10%.

Some boroughs such as Islington have no wards in the top 10% or bottom 10%. Further research along the lines of recent work by the Cripplegate Foundation (see Other data) is required before any definitive conclusions can be made about this finding.

Data used

CACI Paycheck data for 2006

Paycheck has estimated an average income figure for each ward in London. On average there are about 20 wards per borough. In this analysis, the 10% of wards with the highest average incomes are defined as 'rich'. The 10% with the lowest average are defined as 'poor'. Paycheck is collected by CACI, a private company, unlike other official data sources used on this site. it is based on data from lifestyle surveys, the Census and other market research. Whereas elsewhere on this site, we have analysed the data ourselves, these figures have already been calculated by CACI.

Other data

Cripplegate Foundation (2008) Invisible Islington: Living in Poverty in Inner London, Rocket Science UK Ltd

Indicator last updated: 14 October 2013