The London's Poverty Profile website uses cookies to give you the best possible experience. By continuing, we will assume you are happy to receive all cookies on the website. More information on cookies can be found on our privacy page.

Comparing London's wealth distribution

Key points

  • The bars on the left show that the poorest households in London have less wealth than the poorest in the rest of Britain (57% less at the 10th percentile), but the richest households have more wealth (22% more at the 90th percentile).
  • London has actually become less unequal with wealth at the 10th percentile rising most (66%) and wealth at the 90th rising least (22%).

Comparing London's wealth distribution

What does the graph show?

This graph looks at how total wealth in London compares with the rest of Great Britain and then how it has changed over time. Rather than look at the total wealth held by a share of the population, it is concerned with the average wealth of a household at a particular point in the distribution. The bars on the left show how total wealth in London compares with the rest of Britain. The bars on the right show how household wealth across the distribution in London in 2010/12 compares with 2006/08. These increases are not adjusted for inflation.

The bars on the left show that the poorest households in London have less wealth than the poorest in the rest of Britain (57% less at the 10th percentile), but the richest households have more wealth (22% more at the 90th percentile). This means that London is much more unequal than the rest of Britain. The total wealth of a household at the 10th percentile in London was £6,300 in 2010/12 compared with £1.1 million at the 90th percentile making the 90:10 ratio 173 in London (this is almost three times the ratio for the rest of Britain, at 60).

The bars on the right show that London has actually become less unequal with wealth at the 10th percentile rising most (66%) and wealth at the 90th rising least (22%). In 2006/08 the 90:10 ratio was 234. But it's worth noting that growth in absolute money terms was still much higher at the top of the distribution: a 66% increase for a household at the 10th percentile amounts to another £2,500; while a 22% rise at the 90th amounts to £200,000.

Data used

Wealth and Assets Survey, ONS via CASE, LSE

Indicator last updated: 15 October 2015