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Child poverty and tenure

Key points

  • Following a decade of increases the number of children in poverty in the private rented sector has more than doubled, reaching a quarter of a million.
  • The number of children living in the social rented sector in poverty is much lower than the early 2000s.
  • At 150,000, the number of children in poverty in owner-occupied housing in London is much lower than the number in rented tenures.

Children in poverty by tenure

What does this graph show?

It is often assumed that most of those in the private rented sector are working-age adult households, living alone or sharing, but this is no longer the case. Following a decade of increases the number of children in poverty in the private rented sector has more than doubled, reaching a quarter of a million in the three years to 2011/12.

Despite a slight increase in the last year for which data is available, the number of children living in the social rented sector in poverty is much lower than the early 2000s when it stood at 350,000. So in the last ten years the number of children in poverty in social rented housing and the number in private rented housing has converged at 250,000. The number of children in poverty in owner-occupied housing in London is much lower at 150,000.

Data used

Households Below Average Income, DWP

Indicator last updated: 15 October 2015