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Housing tenure trends in London

Key points

  • The proportion of households that rent privately has increased substantially in recent years from a low of 14% in 1991 to 26% in 2014. This is the highest it's been in London since the 1970s but remains much lower than the levels of the 1960s when private renting was the most common tenure.
  • The tenure profile of Inner and Outer London is distinct from the rest of England. In Inner London the proportion of households that rent privately is much higher at 31%. But so is the proportion of social renters at 32% and with owner-occupation at 37% private renting is, only just, the least common tenure. In Outer London, owner-occupation continues to be the dominant tenure (59%) but the social rented sector is relatively small (17%) so the private rented sector is the second largest tenure accounting for a quarter (24%) of households.

Housing tenure trends in London

What does this graph show?

The graph shows how housing tenure has changed in London since the 1960s. The proportion of households that rent privately has increased substantially in recent years from a low of 14% in 1991 to 26% in 2014. This is the highest it's been in London since the 1970s but remains much lower than the levels of the 1960s when private renting was the most common tenure.

The rise in the share of households living in the private rented sector in the 1990s initially coincided with a fall in social renting but in the 2000s private renting rose whilst owner-occupation fell. These trends in London have been mirrored across the rest of England.

Nonetheless, the tenure profile of Inner and Outer London is distinct from the rest of England. In Inner London the proportion of households that rent privately is much higher at 31%. But so is the proportion of social renters at 32% and with owner-occupation at 37% private renting is, only just, the least common tenure. In Outer London, owner-occupation continues to be the dominant tenure (59%) but the social rented sector is relatively small (17%) so the private rented sector is the second largest tenure accounting for a quarter (24%) of households.

Data used

Housing in London, GLA, 2014 & Housing Tenure of Households, ONS via GLA Datastore 2014

Indicator last updated: 19 October 2015