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Temporary accommodation in London over time

Key points

  • At the start of 2015, there were 48,000 London households living in temporary accommodation - three times higher than the whole of the rest of England (16,000).
  • In 2015, 74,000 London children were living in temporary accommodation.
  • The number of households in temporary accommodation has risen since 2011 but is below the levels of the mid-2000s.
  • A minority (12%) of these families in temporary accommodation were not living in conventional homes: 3,000 were living in B&B accommodation and 2,600 were in a hostel. The vast majority (77% or 37,000) were living in the private rented sector.

Temporary accommodation in London over time

What does this graph show?

Councils can place homeless households in temporary accommodation while suitable settled accommodation is identified. The graph shows the number of households in temporary accommodation in London at the end of each year. The number of households in temporary accommodation peaked in the mid-2000s at 63,000 and fell sharply in line with the fall in homelessness acceptances to 36,000 in 2011. But as the number of acceptances has risen so too has the number of households in temporary accommodation, reaching 48,000 at the start of 2015, 38,000 of which (78%) contained children (accounting for 74,000 children).

Of these a minority (12%) were not living in conventional homes: 3,000 were living in B&B accommodation and 2,600 were in a hostel. 5,400 were living in social rented homes but the vast majority (77% or 37,000) were living in the private rented sector. Five years ago, most of these placements in the private rented sector were managed by social landlords or by the council themselves, but since 2010 the number of such placements has remained at 20,000 while the number arranged directly with the landlord has risen from 5,200 to 17,000 in 2015 (including an increase of 5,000 in the last year alone).

At the start of 2015 the number of London households living in temporary accommodation was three times higher than the rest of England, at 48,000 and 16,000 respectively.

Data used

P1E Homelessness returns, DCLG; the data is for London

Indicator last updated: 17 February 2017