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Unemployment numbers over time

Key points

  • In 2014 there were 320,000 unemployed people living in London.
  • 53% of unemployed people were men.
  • The number of unemployed people in 2014 was 75,000 fewer than 2013, with male unemployment falling more than female unemployment.

Unemployment numbers over time

What does this graph show?

In 2014 there were 320,000 unemployed people living in London. 53% of unemployed people were men. The graph shows how this has changed overtime.

Previous reports in this series have illustrated unemployment numbers over time through the use of the claimant count, or the number of people receiving Jobseeker's Allowance. This is an increasingly inadequate measure of unemployment: in 2014, only 38% of the unemployed were receiving JSA. This falling proportion of unemployed people receiving JSA is a UK wide trend; though the proportion is lower in London than the UK as a whole.

The number of unemployed people in 2014 was 75,000 fewer than 2013, with male unemployment falling more than female unemployment. After the 2008-09 recession and subsequent stagnation, unemployment in London peaked at 425,000 in 2011, with men making up 55% of the unemployed. The number of unemployed people is now at its lowest since 2008.

One of the key trends in figure 3 is the convergence between male and female unemployment. In the 1990s, an average of 62% of the unemployed were men. In the last five years, the average is 54%. This may be due to an increased proportion of women who are economically active, i.e. working or actively looking for and available for work.

Data used

Regional Labour Market Statistics, ONS.

Indicator last updated: 20 October 2015